Write for Business - Blog

UpWrite Press understands the importance of writing skills in business: We're business people just like you. On this blog you'll find tips to improve your writing, along with topics of interest to our staff.

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    Using Punctuation: Period with Initials and Abbreviations

    Monday, November 22, 2010

    A period should be placed after an initial and after most abbreviations.

    Ms. Inc. O.D. M.A.
    C.E. a.m. U.S.A. Joan Q.

    Note: When an abbreviation is the last word in a sentence, do not add a second period.

    Tom recently received his M.B.A.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Using Punctuation: Period

    Friday, November 19, 2010

    Use a period to end a sentence that makes a statement, requests something, or gives a mild command.

    (Statement) "A gold mine is a hole in the ground with a liar at the top."
    - Mark Twain
    (Request) Please arrange an on-site meeting.
    (Mild Command) "Concentrate on finding your goal; then concentrate on reaching it."
    - Michael Friedsam

    Note: Omit a period after a statement that has parentheses around it if it is part of another sentence.

    These early entrepreneurs (some of them were true visionaries) often met skepticism.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Constructing Sentences: Subject and Predicate

    Thursday, November 18, 2010

    A sentence is one or more words that express a complete thought.

    "Chop your wood, and it will warm you twice."
    - Henry Ford, Sr.

    A sentence must have a subject and a predicate. The subject tells who or what the sentence is about. The predicate, which contains the verb, tells or asks something about the subject.

    "The Edsel is here to stay."
    - Henry Ford II

    Note: In the sentence above, Edsel is the subject - the sentence talks about the Edsel. Is here to stay is the predicate - it says something about the subject.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Using the Right Word: your, you're

    Monday, November 01, 2010

    Your is a possessive pronoun showing ownership. You're is the contraction of "you are."

    "Your job is only as big as you are."
    - George C. Hubbs
    "You're never wrong to do the right thing."
    - Malcom Forbes

    (From Write for Business, 2nd edition, page 302, and Proofreader's Guide PDF, page 52)

    Using the Right Word: wood, would

    Friday, October 29, 2010

    Wood is a noun or an adjective referring to the material trees are made of; would is a form of the verb "will."

    I would not buy that wood to make the filing cabinets.

    (From Write for Business, 2nd edition, page 302, and Proofreader's Guide PDF, page 52)