Write for Business - Blog

UpWrite Press understands the importance of writing skills in business: We're business people just like you. On this blog you'll find tips to improve your writing, along with topics of interest to our staff.

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    Constructing Sentences: Compound Subject

    Thursday, December 02, 2010

    A compound subject has two or more subjects.

    Decisiveness and determination are key ingredients to any successful venture.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Constructing Sentences: Simple Subject and Complete Subject

    Tuesday, November 30, 2010

    A simple subject is the subject without the words that modify it.

    "The greatest test of courage on earth is to bear defeat without losing courage."
    - Robert G. Intersoll

    A complete subject is the simple subject and all the words that modify it.

    "The greatest test of courage on earth is to bear defeat without losing courage."
    - Robert G. Intersoll

    Constructing Sentences: The Subject

    Thursday, November 25, 2010

    The subject is a word, phrase, or clause that tells who or what the sentence is about. It can be a noun, a pronoun, an infinitive, an infinitive phrase, a gerund, a gerund phrase, or a noun clause.

    Technology has changed the way business is done. (noun)
    I can get that for you wholesale. (pronoun)
    To cut costs has been her primary goal. (infinitive phrase)
    Finding that document will be difficult. (gerund phrase)
    When your samples arrive is when you should begin your calls. (noun clause)

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Constructing Sentences: Understood Subject and Predicate

    Tuesday, November 23, 2010

    Either the subject or the predicate or both may be "absent" from a sentence; however, both must be clearly understood.

    "What seems to be wrong?"
    (What is the subject; seems to be wrong is the predicate.)
    "Everything."
    (Everything is the subject; the predicate is wrong is understood.)
    "Be more specific."
    (The subject you is understood; be more specific is the predicate.)

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Constructing Sentences: Subject and Predicate

    Thursday, November 18, 2010

    A sentence is one or more words that express a complete thought.

    "Chop your wood, and it will warm you twice."
    - Henry Ford, Sr.

    A sentence must have a subject and a predicate. The subject tells who or what the sentence is about. The predicate, which contains the verb, tells or asks something about the subject.

    "The Edsel is here to stay."
    - Henry Ford II

    Note: In the sentence above, Edsel is the subject - the sentence talks about the Edsel. Is here to stay is the predicate - it says something about the subject.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.