Write for Business - Blog

UpWrite Press understands the importance of writing skills in business: We're business people just like you. On this blog you'll find tips to improve your writing, along with topics of interest to our staff.

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    Using Punctuation: Comma to Separate Phrases and Clauses

    Monday, December 13, 2010

    A comma should follow an introductory adverb clause or a long introductory phrase.

    "If you don't learn from your mistakes, there's no sense making them." - Laurence J. Peter

    Note: The comma is usually omitted if the phrase or adverb clause follows the independent clause.

    There's no sense making mistakes if you don't learn from them.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Using Punctuation: Comma to Join Independent Clauses

    Friday, December 10, 2010

    Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction (such as and, but, or, nor, for, so) when it is used to link two independent clauses.

    Ability may get you to the top, but only character will keep you there.
    "A doctor can bury his mistakes, but an architect can only advise his client to plant vines." - Frank Lloyd Wright

    Note: Do not mistake a sentence containing a compound verb for a compound sentence. (No comma is needed with a compound verb.)

    Marva quickly checked the document and corrected a few minor errors.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Constructing Sentences: The Predicate

    Thursday, December 09, 2010

    A predicate is the sentence part that tells or asks something about the subject; it always contains a verb.

    "Good management consists in showing average people how to do the work of superior people." - John D. Rockefeller, Sr.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Using Punctuation: Ellipsis after a Period

    Friday, December 03, 2010

    If words from a quoted passage are omitted at the end of a sentence, the ellipsis follows the period.

    "All new employees must fill out the standard work forms - social security, insurance, and payroll. . . . If you have any questions, please contact Rosa for assistance."

    If the quoted material is a complete sentence (even if it was not in the original), use a period, then an ellipsis.

    "All new employees must fill out the standard work forms. . . . Please contact Rosa for assistance."

    Note: The first word of a sentence following a period and an ellipsis may be capitalized, even though it was not capitalized in the original.

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.

    Using Punctuation: Ellipsis

    Monday, November 29, 2010

    Use an ellipsis (three spaced periods) to indicate that words have been omitted in a quoted passage. Leave one space before and after each period.

    (Original) All new employees must fill out the standard work forms - social security, insurance, and payroll. The forms, which may be obtained from your immediate supervisor, should be completed before beginning work. If you have any questions, please contact Rosa for assistance.
    (Quotation) "All new employees must fill out the standard work forms . . . which may be obtained from your immediate supervisor . . . before beginning work."

    For more business-writing tips, browse our blog or use the search box atop the page. Or purchase our handy Proofreader's Guide ebook or Write for Business handbook.